His history...

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...officially taking part in the film “La regina dei Tartari”. You can identify some important periods during his long career (beyond 400 participations among films and TV fictions).

The beginning, that was from the 60’s to the 70’s. He was protagonist like extra and acrobat of numerous films. For instance in "Cleopatra" and "Il Gattopardo". At the time historical or cloak-and-dragger films (Zorro...) as well as traditional western and italocomedy films (with Franco and Ciccio, two famous Italian comedy actors) were up-to-date. During that period Omero began to gain experience, even if he broked his bones very often. His career was marked by many accidents (and that was normal for the type of his trade), but the most serious one struck him just then.

During shootings of a western to Madrid (I forget the title) he risked his life seriously. The scene previewed a jump from a knoll (5 meters) on a man going on horseback, that had to pass under there. As soon as the horse noticed that Omero were dropping, it stopped suddenly leaving him to fall down on the rocky ground. He stayed in hospital to Madrid in serious conditions, two weeks.

The 70’s were the thickest years in engagements and participations. It was the boom for the "western-spaghetti" films, the detective ones and Bud Spencer and Terence Hill films. At the time he began protagonist like actor, as well as like stuntman.

He appears clearly in "Milano Calibro 9" (photo next here), “La Mala ordina”, "Lo chiamavano Trinità", "Roma violenta", "Yuppi Du", "Paura in città", "Squadra antitruffa", "Avere vent'anni" and in nearly all the films of Bud Spencer and Terence Hill. Moreover he played a film like leading actor "Un animale chiamato uomo", a western film (for all these citations you can find photos in the "scene photos gallery").

The 80’s were characteristic for the italocomedy films, the first mammoth productions and, unfortunately, for the beginning of a little crisis of the cinema…

You can find Omero in films like "Ladyhawke" (photo next here), "Al bar dello sport", "La ragazza del metrò" (scene photos). During that period he began working also for television.

On 1981 he went to China where he stayed 6 months, in order to shoot the acrobatic scenes of "Marco Polo", where he was put to hard test by the climatic and surrounding conditions (photos “behind the scenes”). On 1988 he was engaged in Morocco two months, for shooting the Tv film "Il segreto del Sahara. He came back with a fractured arm, because of a fall from horse.

During the 90’s and until his death (2003) television and fictions have had a big success and Omero has taken part in dangerous scenes, like stuntman. He participated assiduously to several series of fictions like "La squadra" where he appears cleverly in some episodes, as well as in "La Piovra", "Il maresciallo Rocca", "Distretto di Polizia", "Ultimo III".

On 1990 Omero was on the set of "Il Padrino" – "The God Father" (third part) like stuntman in the shooting scene, in which all bosses are reunited (“photos scene”). The first American mammoth productions caught... on 1996 in "Daylight" he worked a month carrying out the acrobatic scenes of the tunnel (reproduced in the famous Cinecittà studios, in Rome). Then, shortly before dying, he letf his sign as stuntman in others two mammoth productions... on 2001 he worked on the set of "Gangs of New York" a month (photo near here and in "behind the scenes") and on 2002 he took part in realizing "The Passion", being engaged three weeks...

Omero died on the 11th October 2003 (he was only 61 years) because of a serious disease. I have intention to dedicate him this small space because it was a promise (not kept) that I had given him when he was not still sick. He asked me to realize an advertising space to show to the several cinema productions when he took contacts for job. Unfortunately nowadays is only a site dedicated to my father memory...

Hello great stuntman! Hello Dad…

Transation have been supervised by my fiancée, Tiziana Rossi                  [home]


Copyright ©2005 - Luciano Capanna